Applied LifeSciences & Systems Awarded Competitive Grant from the National Science Foundation
Applied LifeSciences & Systems Awarded Competitive Grant from the National Science Foundation

Small Business Innovation Research Program Provides Seed Funding for R&D

[RALEIGH, NC], December 13, 2016 – Applied LifeSciences & Systems (ALS-S) has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant for $225,000 to conduct research and development (R&D) work on improving the vaccination delivery system for day-of-age chicks.

Poultry producers have an urgent need for more effective vaccination methods to mitigate the losses associated with transitioning away from antibiotics. Applied LifeSciences & Systems has designed a solution to boost food production and provide better ways to protect agricultural systems from diseases by ensuring every bird receives an adequate vaccination at day of hatch.

“The National Science Foundation supports small businesses with the most innovative, cutting-edge ideas that have the potential to become great commercial successes and make huge societal impacts,” said Barry Johnson, Director of the NSF’s Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships. “We hope that this seed funding will spark solutions to some of the most important challenges of our time across all areas of science and technology.”

“We are honored to receive this SBIR/STTR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation,” said Ramin Karimpour, Founder and CEO, Applied LifeSciences & Systems. “Our mission is to develop innovative solutions that help producers raise healthier flocks and improve animal wellbeing, as they minimize the use of antibiotics and save in production costs – and this grant will help us realize that goal for producers.”

Once a small business is awarded a Phase I SBIR/STTR grant (up to $225,000), it becomes eligible to apply for a Phase II grant (up to $750,000). Small businesses with Phase II grants are eligible to receive up to $500,000 in additional matching funds with qualifying third-party investment or sales.
NSF accepts Phase I proposals from small businesses twice annually in June and December. Small businesses with innovative science and technology solutions, and commercial potential are encouraged to apply. All proposals submitted to the NSF SBIR/STTR program undergo a rigorous merit-based review process.

To learn more about the NSF SBIR/STTR program, visit: www.nsf.gov/SBIR.

About the National Science Foundation's Small Business Programs: The National Science Foundation (NSF) awards nearly $190 million annually to startups and small businesses through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, transforming scientific discovery into products and services with commercial and societal impact. The non-dilutive grants support research and development (R&D) across
almost all areas of science and technology helping companies de-risk technology for commercial success. The NSF is an independent federal agency with a budget of about $7 billion that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering.

About Applied LifeSciences & Systems: Applied LifeSciences & Systems (ALS-S) is a bio-systems company focused on improving animal health and productivity in the poultry, livestock and aquaculture industries. To learn more about solutions from ALS-S, visit: www.als-s.com.

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